Ukip Factfile

Having been critical of Ukip’s performance in the recent local elections, in fairness I thought it only right and proper to publish some facts about their performance.

  • In 2008 (the comparable point in the electoral cycle), UKIP took 98,000 votes in England.  In 2012 we took over 220,000 – our vote has more than doubled since 2008.
  • UKIP fielded 691 candidates this year, up from 450 in 2008.
  • The average UKIP candidate had a percentage vote share of 13.8% – our highest ever.
  • UKIP won 7 seats in England and 2 in Wales. 
  • Lisa Duffy took 61% of the vote to win the final seat in Ramsey by a landslide. 
  • In Rushmoor, two UKIP councillors who had joined from the Conservatives and a third UKIP  councillor was also elected to complete a clean sweep in that ward. 
  • Piers Wauchope was elected to Tunbridge Wells council, unseating the Leader of the Council in the process. 
  • UKIP took its first ever councillor (above parish/town council level) in the Yorkshire & North Lincolnshire region when Ron Shepherd was elected to NE Lincolnshire Council. 
  • Other UKIP councillors elected were in Thurrock, Merthyr and Vale of Glamorgan. 
  • In Plymouth, UKIP averaged 20.6% of the vote. 
  • In Sheffield, UKIP achieved a first in a major UK city by taking almost 3,000 more votes than the Conservatives across the city.
  • The UKIP vote seemed relatively consistent throughout the country. 
  • Across the country, 136 candidates finished in second place.  40 of these were in Yorkshire & North Lincolnshire alone. 
  • 50 candidates took more than 25% of the vote and 105 took more than 20%.
  • Our vote was spread evenly throughout the country – with regions varying from a 10.5% average to 16.9%.
  • UKIP took 15.3% in Conservative wards, 13.2% in Labour wards and 10.7% in Liberal Democrat wards. 
  • Churchill ward of Adur Council saw a UKIP candidate lose by just 1 vote. 
  • Young Independence’s target ward of Gorleston in Great Yarmouth saw Matthew Smith take 34.7% of the vote and miss election by just 48 votes. 
  • UKIP’s vote averaged 20.2% where there were just 3 candidates on the ballot paper – usually but not exclusively UKIP v Labour v Conservatives.  But when 7 or more candidates were standing, the average dropped to 5.9%.
  • UKIP performed better than ever before in the Metropolitan Borough Councils, averaging 11.9% where we stood on those Councils. 
  • More than two thirds of all UKIP candidates took more than 10% of the vote.

I still stand by my previous criticisms and comments, though. With an improved campaign and strategy one can only wonder at what might have been…….


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10 Responses

  1. Peter C says:

    “UKIP’s vote averaged 20.2% where there were just 3 candidates on the ballot paper – usually but not exclusively UKIP v Labour v Conservatives. But when 7 or more candidates were standing, the average dropped to 5.9%.”

    This I would judge the key statistic. It indicates that UKIP is reaping the benefit of the protest vote, those who cannot bear any of the LibLabCon, rather than attracting party adherents. It also meshes some what with results in the last GE vote.

    As you have said before, David, if they want GE success they need to examine just what their best candidates did or didn’t do and use the knowledge to target winnable constituencies with all their resources. Still if all else stays the same they are definitely in line to cripple the Conservative vote at the next GE, assuming they have any left, of course.

    It isn’t easy to break into the land of the successful political party, the Liberals have been trying to get back in for over eighty years after all, and their current meagre success is a coalition that place that might well see them outright destroyed, as they so richly deserve along with the other pair.

    • david says:

      Pleased you picked that point up PC – ’twas the first thing that leaped out at me too!

      Likewise the point about looking at what successful candidates did – and what those in Aylesbury are doing once elected!

  2. BJ says:

    I think that this years results have been achieved because of the LibDem factor WfW.

    In Plymouth a standing LibDem was as rare as rocking horse droppings – they had all switched to Labour – the protest vote seems to be dropping in our lap.

    But there’s a thought – how would Labour have got on without this new blood; my new Labour representative is an 18 year old A-level student – no offence to her, but it does indicate a shortage of experienced Labour people.

    It was noticeable though that UKIP stood in all wards – even though there were “paper candidates” amongst them.

    But it has been noticeable that the number of UKIP votes has been steadily increasing over the last few elections.

    As Farage has said – the more people who defect from the three main established parties, the more experience will be gained – UKIP are still a young party.

    • david says:

      Plymouth is interesting in that it shows what happens when you have paper candidates standing the ‘real’ candidates benefit because those in other wards think Hey this lot are making an effort……..

      See my comment above to PC re protest vote, though…….

  3. Durotrigan says:

    An interesting piece of number crunching. If, as a report in The Telegraph last weekend would seem to suggest, the Conservative Party were to focus still further upon targeting ethnic minority voters rather than the English, how many more votes might UKIP pick up?

    The party of ex-Ukipper Paul Weston – the British Freedom Party – fared abysmally. Take a look at the stats here: http://durotrigan.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/british-freedom-party-storms-to-success.html

    I’ll be taking a look at the performance of some of the other smaller parties, such as the English Democrats, over the next couple of days.

  4. TomTom says:

    They need better marketing and a focus on CORE local issues with a standard logo and candidates who know they can win. I am still struck by Bradford West where Sonja McNally was a Green in January and UKIP by March and the Green candidate Dawud Islam who came in just behind her, joined Respect straight after Galloway’s win.

    Green Opportunism starts to make one wonder about quality of candidates

    UKIP

    • Peter C says:

      “I am still struck by Bradford West where Sonja McNally was a Green in January and UKIP by March and the Green candidate Dawud Islam who came in just behind her, joined Respect straight after Galloway’s win.”

      Such people should never even be considered as candidates, they are solely interested in gaining a seat and will mould their political beliefs to suit, they are the rot at heart of politics, like Cable was a Labour councillor, Labour employee and a failed Labour candidate before slithering into the LibDems. Cameron, Osborne, Blair, Mandelson are the same type, being there is the aim, they would espouse the views of any party they thought would give them a chance.

      • david says:

        I agree, especially when considering Cons now defecting to Ukip because the light has dawned. The light has been shining since 2005 when Cameron became leader, for heavens sake!

        • Peter C says:

          It is certainly permissible for a Conservative to defect to UKIP, UKIP is in essence the classic, small ‘c’, English Conservative party of old whereas Cameron’s Tories are the New Social Democratic Conservative party. In such an instance it is more a case of righting the wrong of the party having defected from its core.

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